On Monday, June 15, 2020, the United States Supreme Court momentously ruled that federal law designed to prevent discrimination in the workplace protects gay, lesbian and transgender employees. In Bostock v. Clayton County, the Court held that individuals who
Continue Reading Supreme Court Finds Title VII Prohibits LGBTQ Discrimination

A recent Pennsylvania case provides a good reminder that retaliation claims can arise long after an employee is no longer employed and that employers need to keep potential retaliation claims in mind when responding to reference checks on former employees.
Continue Reading Retaliation Claims Can Arise Long After Employment Relationship Ends

Social media icons on a phoneIn our recent employment law seminar, we discussed how to manage employees who are authorized to post on the company’s social media accounts. Here are some key points to focus on when allowing employees access to your company’s social media
Continue Reading How to Manage Employees Who Are Authorized to Post on Company Social Media Accounts

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced that it reached a settlement with an agricultural company located in California. The settlement concludes an investigation into whether the company discriminated against workers based on their legal status in violation of the
Continue Reading U.S. DOJ Settles Immigration-Related Discrimination Claim Against California Agricultural Company

As the longest government shutdown in history has come to an end, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently released guidance for employers faced with upcoming EEO-1 submission deadlines and responding to charges of discrimination filed during the government shutdown.
Continue Reading EEOC Issues Guidance on Submission Deadlines Impacted by Government Shutdown

Social Media NetworksNowadays we are constantly bombarded with news of events that arouse our political views. Social media both perpetuates these events and provides a platform for virtually anyone to express their social and political views. Political views are often visible to coworkers, including management and supervisors who have the discretion to make termination decisions. What difference might this make for South Carolina employers?

South Carolina statute S.C. Code §16-17-560 makes it a crime to “discharge a citizen from employment or occupation . . . because of political opinions or the exercise of political rights and privileges guaranteed to every citizen by the Constitution and laws of the United States or by the Constitution and laws of this State.” In certain circumstances, an employee may bring a lawsuit against their employer for wrongful termination when this section is violated.
Continue Reading When Social Media, Politics and the Workplace Collide

Lactation Room Sign

We recently highlighted the “Act to Establish Pay Equity,” which was spearheaded by the SC Women’s Rights & Empowerment Network (WREN).

WREN is also supporting the “South Carolina Lactation Support Act” that expands upon the Pregnancy Accommodations Act by providing nursing employees with the right to break time and private space to express milk in their workplaces. A key provision of the Lactation Support Act is that it would apply to all employers, regardless of the number of employees.
Continue Reading What Would the Lactation Support Act Mean for SC Employers?