When it comes to accommodating clients’ needs, whether your website is accessible to those with vision, hearing, or cognitive disabilities is not often a concern that readily comes to mind. However, lawsuits regarding web accessibility under the Americans with Disabilities
Continue Reading World Wide Web Commission Releases New Standards for Website Accessibility

The ruling in the AARP v. EEOC case may be detrimental to employers and their healthcare plans because the EEOC may either reduce the percentage of its allowable inducement (or penalty) below 30% of the employee cost for participation in
Continue Reading Court’s Ruling Requiring The EEOC To Reconsider Its “Wellness” Regulations Is Not Necessarily A Good Thing For Employers

Recently, the District Court for the Southern District of Florida held in Gil v. Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc., that Winn Dixie’s website violated Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), and awarded the plaintiff attorneys fees and injunctive
Continue Reading Florida Court Rules Grocery Store Website is Subject to the ADA

Websites and mobile apps (collectively “website(s)”) are a common tool used by businesses of all varieties and sizes to reach current and potential customers. They have revolutionized the manner in which businesses advertise and service customers. While websites may be
Continue Reading Is Your Website ADA Compliant?

Inappropriate interview questions create a risk of discrimination claims under various state and federal anti-discrimination laws.  (For example, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, as amended by the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act.)   Therefore, when interviewing an applicant for a job, you must avoid questions relating to race, sex, national origin, age, pregnancy, religion and disability, which are irrelevant as to whether he or she is qualified for the job.

Even asking questions that do not appear discriminatory on their face may be considered unlawful when they screen out a disproportionately high percentage of candidates on the basis of protected status and are not justified by any business purpose.  For example, asking about whether an applicant owns their own home could be considered racial discrimination.


Continue Reading Can I Ask About This? Interview Do’s and Don’ts

The EEOC has issued its long-awaited guidance on wellness programs and what is considered involuntary under the ADA.  The EEOC is the administrative agency charged with enforcing the ADA.  It issued a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) of Proposed
Continue Reading Long Awaited Guidance from the EEOC Regarding Wellness Programs!